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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

candles. She is led with closed eyes along the street by two 

relatives, each holding one of her hands. The bride's head is 

held in its proper position by a female relative, who walks 

behind her. She wears a veil, and is not allowed to open her eyes 

until she is set on the bridal bed, with a girl friend beside 

her. Amongst the Zulus, the bridal party proceeds to the house of 

the groom, having the bride hidden amongst them. They stand 

facing the groom, while the bride sings a song. Her companions 

then suddenly break away, and she is discovered standing in the 

middle, with a fringe of beads covering her face. Amongst the 

people of Kumaun, the husband sees his wife first after the 

joining of hands. Amongst the Bedui of North East Africa, the 

bride is brought on the evening of the wedding-day by her girl 

friends, to the groom's house. She is closely muffled up. Amongst 

the Jews of Jerusalem, the bride, at the marriage ceremony, 

stands under the nuptial canopy, her eyes being closed, that she 

may not behold the face of her future husband before she reaches 

the bridal chamber. In Melanesia, the bride is carried to her new 

home on some one's back, wrapped in many mats, with palm-fans 

held about her face, because she is supposed to be modest and 

shy. Among the Damaras, the groom cannot see his bride for four 

days after marriage. When a Damara woman is asked in marriage, 

she covers her face for a time with the flap of a headdress made 

for this purpose. At the Thlinkeet marriage ceremony, the bride 

must look down, and keep her head bowed all the time; during the 

wedding-day, she remains hiding in a corner of the house, and the 

groom is forbidden to enter. At a Yezedee marriage, the bride is 

covered from head to foot with a thick veil, and when arrived at 

her new home, she retires behind a curtain in the corner of a 

darkened room, where she remains for three days before her 

husband is permitted to see her. In Corea, the bride has to cover 

her face with her long sleeves, when meeting the bridegroom at 

the wedding. The Manchurian bride uncovers her face for the first 

time when she descends from the nuptial couch. It is dangerous 

even to see dangerous persons. Sight is a method of contagion in 

primitive science, and the idea coincides with the psychological 

aversion to see dangerous things, and with sexual shyness and 

timidity. In the customs noticed, we can distinguish the feeling 

that it is dangerous to the bride for her husband's eyes to be 

upon her, and the feeling of bashfulness in her which induces her 

neither to see him nor to be seen by him. These ideas explain the 

origin of the bridal veil and similar concealments. The bridal 

veil is used, to take a few instances, in China, Burmah, Corea, 

Russia, Bulgaria, Manchuria, and Persia, and in all these cases 

it conceals the face entirely." (E. Crawley, _The Mystic Rose_, 

pp. 328 et seq.) 

 

Alexander Walker, writing in 1846, remarks: "Among old-fashioned 

people, of whom a good example may be found in old country people 

of the middle class in England, it is indecent to be seen with 

the head unclothed; such a woman is terrified at the chance of 

being seen In that condition, and if intruded on at that time, 


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