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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

object of the _uluri_, etc., is to obtain a maximum of protection for the 

mucous membrane with a minimum of concealment. Among the Eskimo, as Nansen 

noted, the corresponding intercrural cord is so thin as to be often 

practically invisible; this may be noted, I may add, in the excellent 

photographs of Eskimo women given by Holm. 

 

But it is evident that, in the beginning, protection is to little or no 

extent the motive for attaching foreign substances to the body. Thus the 

tribes of Central Australia wear no clothes, although they often suffer 

from the cold. But, in addition to armlets, neck-bands and head-bands, 

they have string or hair girdles, with, for the women, a very small apron 

and, for the men, a pubic tassel. The latter does not conceal the organs, 

being no larger than a coin, and often brilliantly coated with white 

pipeclay, especially during the progress of _corrobborees_, when a large 

number of men and women meet together; it serves the purpose of drawing 

attention to the organs.[49] When Forster visited the unspoilt islanders 

of the Pacific early in the eighteenth century, he tells us that, though 

they wore no clothes, they found it necessary to cover themselves with 

various ornaments, especially on, the sexual parts. "But though their 

males," he remarks, "were to all appearances equally anxious in this 

respect with their females, this part of their dress served only to make 

that more conspicuous which it intended to hide."[50] He adds the 

significant remark that "these ideas of decency and modesty are only 

observed at the age of sexual maturity," just as in Central Australia 

women may only wear aprons after the initiation of puberty. 

 

"There are certain things," said Montaigne, "which are hidden in order to 

be shown;" and there can be no doubt that the contention of Westermarck 

and others, that ornament and clothing were, in the first place, intended, 

not to conceal or even to protect the body, but, in large part, to render 

it sexually attractive, is fully proved.[51] We cannot, in the light of 

all that has gone before, regard ornaments and clothing as the sole cause 

of modesty, but the feelings that are thus gathered around the garment 

constitute a highly important factor of modesty. 

 

Among some Australian tribes it is said that the sexual organs 

are only covered during their erotic dances; and it is further 

said that in some parts of the world only prostitutes are 

clothed. "The scanty covering," as Westermarck observes, "was 

found to act as the most powerful obtainable sexual stimulus." It 

is undoubtedly true that this statement may be made not merely of 

the savage, but of the most civilized world. All observers agree 

that the complete nudity of savages, unlike the civilized 

_decollete_ or _detrousse_, has no suggestion of sexual 

allurement. (Westermarck quotes numerous testimonies on this 

point, op. cit., pp. 192 et seq.) Dr. R.W. Felkin remarks 

concerning Central Africa, that he has never met more indecency 

than in Uganda, where the penalty of death is inflicted on an 

adult found naked in the street. (_Edinburgh Medical Journal_, 

April, 1884.) A study of pictures or statuary will alone serve to 

demonstrate that nakedness is always chaster in its effects than 

partial clothing. As a well-known artist, Du Maurier, has 

remarked (in _Trilby_), it is "a fact well known to all painters 

and sculptors who have used the nude model (except a few shady 


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