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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

only by a snap of the fingers (Dufour, op. cit., vol. ii, p. 

174). 

 

In modern Europe, as seems fairly evident from the early 

realistic dramatic literature of various countries, no special 

horror of speaking plainly regarding the sacro-pubic regions and 

their functions existed among the general population until the 

seventeenth century. There is, however, one marked exception. 

Such a feeling clearly existed as regards menstruation. It is not 

difficult to see why it should have begun at this function. We 

have here not only a function confined to one sex and, therefore, 

easily lending itself to a vocabulary confined to one sex; but, 

what is even of more importance, the belief which existed among 

the Romans, as elsewhere throughout the world, concerning the 

specially dangerous and mysterious properties of menstruation, 

survived throughout mediaeval times. (See e.g., Ploss and Bartels, 

_Das Weib_, Bd. I, XIV; also Havelock Ellis, _Man and Woman_, 

fourth ed. Ch. XI.) The very name, _menses_ ("monthlies"), is a 

euphemism, and most of the old scientific names for this function 

are similarly vague. As regards popular feminine terminology 

previous to the eighteenth century, Schurig gives us fairly ample 

information (_Parthenologia_, 1729, pp. 27 et seq.). He remarks 

that both in Latin and Germanic countries, menstruation was 

commonly designated by some term equivalent to "flowers," 

because, he says, it is a blossoming that indicates the 

possibility of fruit. German peasant women, he tells us, called 

it the rose-wreath (Rosenkrantz). Among the other current 

feminine names for menstruation which he gives, some are purely 

fanciful; thus, the Italian women dignified the function with the 

title of "marchese magnifico;" German ladies, again, would use 

the locution, "I have had a letter," or would say that their 

cousin or aunt had arrived. These are closely similar to the 

euphemisms still used by women. 

 

It should be added that euphemisms for menstruation are not 

confined to Europe, and are found among savages. According to 

Hill Tout (_Journal of the Anthropological Institute_, 1904, p. 

320; and 1905, p. 137), one of these euphemisms was "putting on 

the moccasin," and in another branch of the same people, "putting 

the knees together," "going outside" (in allusion to the 

customary seclusion at this period in a solitary hut), and so on. 

 

It would, however, be a mistake to suppose that this process is an 

intensification of modesty. It is, on the contrary, an attenuation of it. 

The observances of modesty become merely a part of a vast body of rules of 

social etiquette, though a somewhat stringent part on account of the vague 

sense still persisting of a deep-lying natural basis. It is a significant 

coincidence that the eighteenth century, which was marked by this new 

extension of the social ritual of modesty, also saw the first appearance 

of a new philosophic impulse not merely to analyze, but to dissolve the 

conception of modesty. This took place more especially in France. 

 

The swift rise to supremacy, during the seventeenth century, of logical 

and rational methods of thinking, in conjunction with the new development 

of geometrical and mathematical science, led in the eighteenth century to 

a widespread belief in France that human customs and human society ought 


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