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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

blushing, and Bargagli, the Siennese novelist, wrote in the sixteenth 

century that, "it is commonly said of women, that they will do in the dark 

what they would not do in the light." It is true that the immodesty of a 

large city at night is to some extent explained by the irruption of 

prostitutes at that time; prostitutes, being habitually nearer to the 

threshold of immodesty, are more markedly affected by this influence. But 

it is an influence to which the most modest women are, at all events in 

some degree, susceptible. It has, indeed, been said that a woman is always 

more her real self in the dark than in the glare of daylight; this is part 

of what Chamberlain calls her night-inspiration. 

 

"Traces of the night-inspiration, of the influence of the 

primitive fire-group, abound in woman. Indeed, it may be said 

(the life of Southern Europe and of American society of to-day 

illustrates this point abundantly) that she is, in a sense, a 

night-being, for the activity, physical and moral, of modern 

women (revealed e.g. in the dance and the nocturnal 

intellectualities of society) in this direction is remarkable. 

Perhaps we may style a good deal of her ordinary day-labor as 

rest, or the commonplaces and banalities of her existence, her 

evening and night life being the true side of her activities" 

(A.F. Chamberlain, "Work and Rest," _Popular Science Monthly_, 

March, 1902). Giessler, who has studied the general influence of 

darkness on human psychic life, reaches conclusions which 

harmonize with these (C.M. Giessler, "Der Einfluss der Dunkelheit 

auf das Seelenleben des Menschen," _Vierteljahrsschrift fuer 

wissenschaftliche Philosophie_, 1904, pp. 255-279). I have not 

been able to see Giessler's paper, but, according to a summary of 

it, he comes to the result that in the dark the soul's activities 

are nearer to its motor pole than to its sensitive pole, and that 

there is a tendency for phenomena belonging to the early period 

of development to be prominent, motor memory functioning more 

than representative memory, attention more than apperception, 

imagination more than logical thinking, egoistic more than 

altruistic morals. 

 

It is curious to note that short-sightedness, naturally, though 

illogically, tends to exert the same influence as darkness in this 

respect; I am assured by short-sighted persons of both sexes that they are 

much more liable to the emotions of shyness and modesty with their glasses 

than without them; such persons with difficulty realize that they are not 

so dim to others as others are to them. To be in the company of a blind 

person seems also to be a protection against shyness.[67] It is 

interesting to learn that congenitally blind children are as sensitive to 

appearances as normal children, and blush as readily.[68] This would seem 

to be due to the fact that the habitually blind have permanently adjusted 

their mental focus to that of normal persons, and react in the same manner 

as normal persons; blindness is not for them, as it is for the 

short-sighted without their glasses, a temporary and relative, almost 

unconscious refuge from clear vision. 

 

It is, of course, not as the mere cloak of a possible blush that darkness 

gives courage; it is because it lulls detailed self-realization, such 

conscious self-realization being always a source of fears, and the blush 

their definite symbol and visible climax. It is to the blush that we must 


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