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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Hutchinson was compelled, some years ago, to exclude lady members of the 

medical profession from the instructive demonstrations at his museum, "on 

account of the unwillingness of male patients to undress before them." A 

similar unwillingness is not found among women patients, but it must be 

remembered that, while women are accustomed to men as doctors, men (in 

England) are not yet accustomed to women as doctors. 

 

[67] "I am acquainted with the case of a shy man," writes Dr. Harry 

Campbell, in his interesting study of "Morbid Shyness" (_British Medical 

Journal_, September 26, 1896), "who will make himself quite at home in the 

house of a blind person, and help himself to wine with the utmost 

confidence, whereas if a member of the family, who can see, comes into the 

room, all his old shyness returns, and he wishes himself far away." 

 

[68] Stanley Hall ("Showing Off and Bashfulness," _Pedagogical Seminary_, 

June, 1903), quotes Dr. Anagnos, of the Perkins Institute for the Blind, 

to this effect. 

 

[69] Thus, Sonnini, in the eighteenth century, noted that the country 

women in Egypt only wore a single garment, open from the armpits to the 

knees on each side, so that it revealed the body at every movement; "but 

this troubles the women little, provided the face is not exposed." 

(_Voyage dans la Haute et Basse Egypte_, 1779, vol. i, p, 289.) When 

Casanova was at Constantinople, the Comte de Bonneval, a convert to Islam, 

assured him that he was mistaken in trying to see a woman's face when he 

might easily obtain greater favors from her. "The most reserved of Turkish 

women," the Comte assured him, "only carries her modesty in her face, and 

as soon as her veil is on she is sure that she will never blush at 

anything." (_Memoires_, vol. i, p. 429.) 

 

[70] It is worth noting that this impulse is rooted in the natural 

instinctive acts and ideas of childhood. Stanley Hall, dealing with the 

"Early Sense of Self," in the report already mentioned, refers to the eyes 

as perhaps even more than the hands, feet, and mouth, "the centres of that 

kind of self-consciousness which is always mindful of how the self appears 

to others," and proceeds to mention "the very common impression of young 

children that if the eyes are covered or closed they cannot be seen. Some 

think the entire body thus vanishes from sight of others; some, that the 

head also ceases to be visible; and a still higher form of this curious 

psychosis is that, when they are closed, the soul cannot be seen." 

(_American Journal of Psychology_, vol. ix, No. 3, 1898.) The instinctive 

and unreasoned character of this act is further shown by its occurrence in 

idiots. Naecke mentions that he once had occasion to examine the abdomen of 

an idiot, who, thereupon, attempted to draw down his shirt with the left 

hand, while with the right he covered his eyes. 

 

[71] Cf. Stanley Hall and T. Smith, "Showing Off and Bashfulness," 

_American Journal of Psychology_, June, 1903. 

 


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