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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

notions, that it has become strong and healthy and vigorous. It 

is the ordeal of it, for to show itself natural, to be always 

true, without shrinking, it must have all the lovable qualities, 

and have them without seeking, as a second nature. What we call 

'natural,' is indeed really acquired; it is the gift of a 

physical and moral evolution which it is precisely the object of 

modesty to keep. Modesty is the feeling of the true, that is to 

say, of the healthy, in love; it long exists as a vision, not yet 

attained; vague, yet sufficiently clear for all that deviates 

from it to be repelled as offensive and painful. At first, a 

remote and seemingly inaccessible ideal, as it comes nearer it 

grows human and individual, and emerges from the region of dream, 

ceasing not to be loved as ideal, even when it is possessed as 

real. 

 

"At first sight, it seems paradoxical to define modesty as an 

aspiration towards truth in love; it seems, on the contrary, to 

be an altogether factitious feeling. But to simplify the problem, 

we have to suppose modesty reduced to its normal functions, 

disengaged from its superstitions, its variegated customs and 

prejudices, the true modesty of simple and healthy natures, as 

far removed from prudery as from immodesty. And what we term the 

natural, or the true in love, is the singular mingling of two 

forms of imaginations, wrongly supposed to be incompatible: ideal 

aspiration and the sense for the realities of life. Thus defined, 

modesty not only repudiates that cold and dissolving criticism 

which deprives love of all poetry, and prepares the way for a 

brutal realism; it also excludes that light and detached 

imagination which floats above love, the mere idealism of heroic 

sentiments, which cherishes poetic illusions, and passes, without 

seeing it, the love that is real and alive. True modesty implies 

a love not addressed to the heroes of vain romances, but to 

living people, with their feet on the earth. But on the other 

hand, modesty is the respect of love; if it is not shocked by 

its physical necessities, if it accepts physiological and 

psychological conditions, it also maintains the ideal of those 

moral proprieties outside of which, for all of us, love cannot be 

enjoyed. When love is really felt, and not vainly imagined, 

modesty is the requirement of an ideal of dignity, conceived as 

the very condition of that love. Separate modesty from love, that 

is, from love which is not floating in the air, but crystallized 

around a real person, and its psychological reality, its poignant 

and tragic character, disappears." (Dugas, "La Pudeur," _Revue 

Philosophique_, Nov., 1903.) So conceived, modesty becomes a 

virtue, almost identical with the Roman _modestia_. 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[72] Freud remarks that one may often hear, concerning elderly ladies, 

that in their youth in the country, they suffered, almost to collapse, 

from haemorrhages from the genital passage, because they were too modest to 

seek medical advice and examination; he adds that it is extremely rare to 

find such an attitude among our young women to-day. (S. Freud, _Zur 

Neurosenlehre_, 1906, p. 182.) It would be easy to find evidence of the 

disappearance of misplaced signs of modesty formerly prevalent, although 

this mark of increasing civilization has not always penetrated to our laws 


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