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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

Wiltshire, who made various interesting observations regarding 

the physiology of menstruation, wrote: "Many years ago, I 

concluded that every women had a law peculiar to herself, which 

governed the times of her bringing forth (and conceiving); that 

she was more prone to bring forth at certain epochs than at 

others; and subsequent researches have established the accuracy 

of the forecast." He further stated his belief in a "primordial 

seasonal aptitude for procreation, the impress of which still 

remains, and, to some extent, governs the breeding-times of 

humanity." (A. Wiltshire, "Lectures on the Comparative Physiology 

of Menstruation," _British Medical Journal_, March, 1883, pp. 

502, etc.) 

 

Westermarck, in a chapter of his _History of Human Marriage_, 

dealing with the question of "A Human Pairing Season in Primitive 

Times," brings forward evidence showing that spring, or, rather, 

early summer, is the time for increase of the sexual instinct, 

and argues that this is a survival of an ancient pairing season; 

spring, he points out, is a season of want, rather than 

abundance, for a frugivorous species, but when men took to herbs, 

roots, and animal food, spring became a time of abundance, and 

suitable for the birth of children. He thus considers that in 

man, as in lower animals, the times of conception are governed by 

the times most suitable for birth. 

 

Rosenstadt, as we shall see later, also believes that men to-day 

have inherited a physiological custom of procreating at a certain 

epoch, and he thus accounts for the seasonal changes in the 

birthrate. 

 

Heape, who also believes that "at one period of its existence the 

human species had a special breeding season," follows Wiltshire 

in suggesting that "there is some reason to believe that the 

human female is not always in a condition to breed." (W. Heape, 

"Menstruation and Ovulation of _Macacus rhesus_," _Philosophical 

Transactions_, 1897; id. "The Sexual Season of Mammals," 

_Quarterly Journal Microscopical Science_, 1900.) 

 

Except, however, in one important respect, with which we shall presently 

have to deal, few attempts have been made to demonstrate any annual 

organic sexual rhythm. The supposition of such annual cycle is usually 

little more than a deduction from the existence of the well-marked 

seasonal sexual rhythm in animals. Most of the higher animals breed only 

once or twice a year, and at such a period that the young are born when 

food is most plentiful. At other periods the female is incapable of 

breeding, and without sexual desires, while the male is either in the same 

condition or in a condition of latent sexuality. Under the influence of 

domestication, animals tend to lose the strict periodicity of the wild 

condition, and become apt for breeding at more frequent intervals. Thus 

among dogs in the wild state the bitch only experiences heat once a year, 

in the spring. Among domesticated dogs, there is not only the spring 

period of heat, early in the year, but also an autumn period, about six 

months later; the primitive period, however, remains the most important 

one, and the best litters of pups are said to be produced in the spring. 

The mare is in season in spring and summer; sheep take the ram in 

autumn.[128] Many of the menstruating monkeys also, whether or not sexual 


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