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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

ponds. Licentiousness is rare.[141] But in many parts of Russia the 

peasants still attach little value to virginity, and even prefer women who 

have been mothers. The population of the Grisons in the sixteenth century 

held regular meetings not less licentious than those of the Cossacks. 

These were abolished by law. Kowalewsky regards all such customs as a 

survival of early forms of promiscuity.[142] 

 

Frazer (_Golden Bough_, 2d ed., 1900, vol. iii, pp. 236-350) 

fully describes and discusses the dances, bonfires and festivals 

of spring and summer, of Halloween (October 31), and Christmas. 

He also explains the sexual character of these festivals. "There 

are clear indications," he observes (p. 305), "that even human 

fecundity is supposed to be promoted by the genial heat of the 

fires. It is an Irish belief that a girl who jumps thrice over 

the midsummer bonfire will soon marry and become the mother of 

many children; and in various parts of France they think that if 

a girl dances round nine fires she will be sure to marry within a 

year. On the other hand, in Lechrain, people say that if a young 

man and woman, leaping over the midsummer fire together, escape 

unsmirched, the young woman will not become a mother within 

twelve months--the flames have not touched and fertilized her. 

The rule observed in some parts of France and Belgium, that the 

bonfires on the first Sunday in Lent should be kindled by the 

person who was last married, seems to belong to the same class of 

ideas, whether it be that such a person is supposed to receive 

from, or impart to, the fire a generative and fertilizing 

influence. The common practice of lovers leaping over the fires 

hand-in-hand may very well have originated in a notion that 

thereby their marriage would be more likely to be blessed with 

offspring. And the scenes of profligacy which appear to have 

marked the midsummer celebration among the Ehstonians, as they 

once marked the celebration of May Day among ourselves, may have 

sprung, not from the mere license of holiday-makers, but from a 

crude notion that such orgies were justified, if not required, by 

some mysterious bond which linked the life of man, to the courses 

of the heavens at the turning-point of the year." 

 

As regards these primitive festivals, although the evidence is scattered 

and sometimes obscure, certain main conclusions clearly emerge. In early 

Europe there were, according to Grimm, only two seasons, sometimes 

regarded as spring and winter, sometimes as spring and autumn, and for 

mythical purposes these seasons were alone available.[143] The appearance 

of each of these two seasons was inaugurated by festivals which were 

religious and often erotic in character. The Slavonic year began in March, 

at which time there was formerly, it is believed, a great festival, not 

only in Slavonic but also in Teutonic countries. In Northern Germany there 

were Easter bonfires always associated with mountains or hills. The Celtic 

bonfires were held at the beginning of May, while the Teutonic May-day, or 

_Walpurgisnacht_, is a very ancient sacred festival, associated with 

erotic ceremonial, and regarded by Grimm as having a common origin with 

the Roman _floralia_ and the Greek _dionysia_. Thus, in Europe, Grimm 

concludes: "there are four different ways of welcoming summer. In Sweden 


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