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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

countries especially there was a great festival at the time. The Germanic 

year began at Martinmas (November 11th), and the great festival of the 

year was then held. It is the oldest Germanic festival on record, and 

retained its importance even in the Middle Ages. There was feasting all 

night, and the cattle that were to be killed were devoted to the gods; the 

goose was associated with this festival.[150] These autumn festivals 

culminated in the great festival of the winter solstice which we have 

perpetuated in the celebrations of Christmas and New Year. Thus, while 

the two great primitive culminating festivals of spring and autumn 

correspond exactly (as we shall see) with the seasons of maximum 

fecundation, even in the Europe of to-day, the earlier spring (March) 

and--though less closely--autumn (November) festivals correspond with the 

periods of maximum spontaneous sexual disturbance, as far as I have been 

able to obtain precise evidence of such disturbance. That the maximum of 

physiological sexual excitement should tend to appear earlier than the 

maximum of fecundation is a result that might be expected. 

 

The considerations so far brought forward clearly indicate that among 

primitive races there are frequently one or two seasons in the 

year--especially spring and autumn--during which sexual intercourse is 

chiefly or even exclusively carried on, and they further indicate that 

these primitive customs persist to some extent even in Europe to-day. It 

would still remain, to determine whether any such influence affects the 

whole mass of the civilized population and determines the times at which 

intercourse, or fecundation, most frequently takes place. 

 

This question can be most conveniently answered by studying the seasonal 

variation in the birthrate, calculating back to the time of conception. 

Wargentin, in Sweden, first called attention to the periodicity of the 

birthrate in 1767.[151] The matter seems to have attracted little further 

attention until Quetelet, who instinctively scented unreclaimed fields of 

statistical investigation, showed that in Belgium and Holland there is a 

maximum of births in February, and, consequently, of conceptions in May, 

and a minimum of births about July, with consequent minimum of conceptions 

in October. Quetelet considered that the spring maximum of conceptions 

corresponded to an increase of vitality after the winter cold. He pointed 

out that this sexual climax was better marked in the country than in 

towns, and accounted for this by the consideration that in the country 

the winter cold is more keenly felt. Later, Wappaeus investigated the 

matter in various parts of northern and southern Europe as well as in 

Chile, and found that there was a maximum of conceptions in May and June 

attributable to season, and in Catholic countries strengthened by customs 

connected with ecclesiastical seasons. This maximum was, he found, 

followed by a minimum in September, October, and November, due to 

gradually increasing exhaustion, and the influence of epidemic diseases, 

as well as the strain of harvest-work. The minimum is reached in the south 

earlier than in the north. About November conceptions again become more 

frequent, and reach the second maximum at about Christmas and New Year. 

This second maximum is very slightly marked in southern countries, but 

strongly marked in northern countries (in Sweden the absolute maximum of 

conceptions is reached in December), and is due, in the opinion of 


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