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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

others who reported, incidentally mentioned the love affairs as 

beginning in the spring. This also agrees with my own 

observations." 

 

Crichton-Browne remarks that children in springtime exhibit restlessness, 

excitability, perversity, and indisposition to exertion that are not 

displayed at other times. This condition, sometimes known as "spring 

fever," has been studied in over a hundred cases, both children and 

adults, by Kline. The majority of these report a feeling of tiredness, 

languor, lassitude, sometimes restlessness, sometimes drowsiness. There is 

often a feeling of suffocation, and a longing for Nature and fresh air and 

day-dreams, while work seems distasteful and unsatisfactory. Change is 

felt to be necessary at all costs, and sometimes there is a desire to 

begin some new plan of life.[161] In both sexes there is frequently a wave 

of sexual emotion, a longing for love. Kline also found by examination of 

a very large number of cases that between the ages of four and seventeen 

it is in spring that running away from home most often occurs. He suggests 

that this whole group of phenomena may be due to the shifting of the 

metabolic processes from the ordinary grooves into reproductive channels, 

and seeks to bring it into connection with the migrations of animals for 

reproductive purposes.[162] 

 

It has long been known that the occurrence of insanity follows an annual 

curve,[163] and though our knowledge of this curve, being founded on the 

date of admissions to asylums, cannot be said to be quite precise, it 

fairly corresponds to the outbreaks of acute insanity. The curve 

presented in Chart 4 shows the admissions to the London County Council 

Lunatic Asylums during the years 1893 to 1897 inclusive; I have arranged 

it in two-month periods, to neutralize unimportant oscillations. In order 

to show that this curve is not due to local or accidental circumstances, 

we may turn to France and take a special and chronic form of mental 

disease: Garnier, in his _Folie a Paris_, presents an almost exactly 

similar curve of the admissions of cases of general paralysis to the 

Infirmerie Speciale at Paris during the years 1886-88 (Chart 5). Both 

curves alike show a major climax in spring and a minor climax in autumn. 

 

 

 

Crime in general in temperate climates tends to reach its maximum 

at the beginning of the hot season, usually in June. Thus, in 

Belgium, the minimum is in February; the maximum in June, thence 

gradually diminishing (Lentz, _Bulletin Societe Medecine Mentale 

Belgique_, March, 1901). In France, Lacassagne has summated the 

data extending over more than 40 years, and finds that for all 

crimes June is the maximum month, the minimum being reached in 

November. He also gives the figures for each class of crime 

separately, and every crime is found to have its own yearly 

curve. Poisonings show a chief maximum in May, with slow fall and 

a minor climax in December; assassinations have a February and a 

November climax. Parricides culminate in May-June, and in October 

(Lacassagne's tables are given by Laurent, _Les Habitues des 

Prisons de Paris_, Ch. 1). 

 

Notwithstanding the general tendency for crime to reach its 

maximum in the first hot month (a tendency not necessarily due to 

the direct influence of heat), we also find, when we consider the 

statistics of crime generally (including sexual crime), that 


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