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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

carried on to the end of March, 1898). 

 

The readers who use the Birmingham Free Lending Libraries are 

about 30,000 in number; they consist very largely of young people 

between the ages of 14 and 25; somewhat less than half are women. 

Certainly we seem to have here a good field for the determination 

of this question. The monthly figures for each of the ten 

Birmingham libraries are given separately, and it is clear at a 

glance that without exception the maximum number of readers of 

prose-fiction at all the libraries during 1897-98 is found in the 

month of March. (I have chiefly taken into consideration the 

figures for 1897-98; the figures for 1896 are somewhat abnormal 

and irregular, probably owing to a decrease in readers, 

attributed to increased activity in trade, and partly to a 

disturbing influence caused by the opening of a large new library 

in the course of the year, suddenly increasing the number of 

readers, and drafting off borrowers from some of the other 

libraries.) Not only so, but there is a second, or autumnal 

climax, almost equaling the spring climax, and occuring with 

equal certainty, appearing during 1897-98 either in October or 

November, and during 1896, constantly in October. Thus, the 

periodicity of the rate of consumption of prose-fiction 

corresponds with the periodicity which is found to occur in the 

conception rate and in sexual ecbolic manifestations. 

 

It is necessary, however, to examine somewhat more closely the 

tables presented in these reports, and to compare the rate of the 

consumption of novels with that of other classes of literature. 

In the first place, if, instead of merely considering the 

consumption of novels per month, we make allowance for the 

varying length of the months, and consider the average _daily_ 

consumption per month, the supremacy of March at once vanishes. 

February is really the month during which most novels were read 

during the first quarter of 1898, except at two libraries, where 

February and March are equal. The result is similar if we 

ascertain the daily averages for the first quarter in 1897, 

while, in 1896 (which, however, as I have already remarked, is a 

rather abnormal year), the daily average for March in many of the 

libraries falls below that for January, as well as for February. 

Again, when we turn to the other classes of books, we find that 

this predominance which February possesses, and to some extent 

shares with March and January, by no means exclusively applies to 

novels. It is not only shared by both music and poetry,--which 

would fit in well with the assumption of a sexual _nisus_,--but 

the department of "history, biography, voyages, and travels" 

shares it also with considerable regularity; so, also, does that 

of "arts, sciences, and natural history," and it is quite well 

marked in "theology, moral philosophy, etc.," and in "juvenile 

literature." We even have to admit that the promptings of the 

sexual instinct bring an increased body of visitors to the 

reference library (where there are no novels), for here, also, 

both the spring and autumnal climaxes are quite distinct. 

Certainly this theory carries us a little too far. 

 

The main factor in producing this very marked annual periodicity 


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