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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

adventure had a large part; girls put themselves in the place of their 

favorite heroines in novels. After seventeen, and earlier in the case of 

girls, day-dreams of love and marriage were found to be frequent. A 

typical confession is that of a girl of nineteen: "I seldom have time to 

build castles in Spain, but when I do, I am not different from most 

Southern girls; i.e., my dreams are usually about a pretty fair specimen 

of a six-foot three-inch biped." 

 

[228] The case has been recorded of a married woman, in love with her 

doctor, who kept a day-dream diary, at last filling three bulky volumes, 

when it was discovered by her husband, and led to an action for divorce; 

it was shown that the doctor knew nothing of the romance in which he 

played the part of hero. Kiernan, in referring to this case (as recorded 

in John Paget's _Judicial Puzzles_), mentions a similar case in Chicago. 

 

[229] _Uranisme_, p. 125. 

 

[230] The acute Anstie remarked, more than thirty years ago, in his work 

on _Neuralgia_: "It is a comparatively frequent thing to see an unsocial, 

solitary life (leading to the habit of masturbation) joined with the bad 

influence of an unhealthy ambition, prompting to premature and false work 

in literature and art." From the literary side, M. Leon Bazalgette has 

dealt with the tendency of much modern literature to devote itself to what 

he calls "mental onanism," of which the probable counterpart, he seems to 

hint, is a physical process of auto-erotism. (Leon Bazalgette, "L'onanisme 

considere comme principe createur en art," _L'Esprit Nouveau_, 1898.) 

 

[231] Pausanias, _Achaia_, Chapter XVII. The ancient Babylonians believed 

in a certain "maid of the night," who appeared to men in sleep and roused 

without satisfying their passions. (Jastrow, _Religion of Babylonia_, p. 

262.) This succubus was the Assyrian Liler, connected with the Hebrew 

Lilith. There was a corresponding incubus, "the little night man," who had 

nocturnal intercourse with women. (Cf. Ploss, _Das Weib_, 7th ed., pp. 521 

et seq.) The succubus and the incubus (the latter being more common) were 

adopted by Christendom; St. Augustine (_De Civitate Dei_, Bk. XV, Ch. 

XXIII) said that the wicked assaults of sylvans and fauns, otherwise 

called incubi, on women, are so generally affirmed that it would be 

impudent to deny them. Incubi flourished in mediaeval belief, and can 

scarcely, indeed, be said to be extinct even to-day. They have been 

studied by many authors; see, e.g., Dufour, _Histoire de la Prostitution_, 

vol. v, Ch. XXV, Saint-Andre, physician-in-ordinary to the French King, 

pointed out in 1725 that the incubus was a dream. It may be added that the 

belief in the succubus and incubus appears to be widespread. Thus, the 

West African Yorubas (according to A.B. Ellis) believe that erotic dreams 

are due to the god Elegbra, who, either as a male or a female, consorts 

with men and women in sleep. 

 

[232] "If any man's seed of copulation go out from him, then he shall 

bathe all his flesh in water and be unclean until the even. And every 

garment, and every skin, whereon is the seed of copulation, shall be 

washed with water and be unclean until the even." Leviticus, XV, v. 16-17. 

 

[233] It should be added that the term _pollutio_ also covers voluntary 

effusion of semen outside copulation. (Debreyne, _Moechialogie_, 

p. 8; for a full discussion of the opinions of theologians concerning 

nocturnal and diurnal pollutions, see the same author's _Essai sur la 


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