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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

II. 

 

Hysteria and the Question of Its Relation to the Sexual Emotions--The 

Early Greek Theories of its Nature and Causation--The Gradual Rise of 

Modern Views--Charcot--The Revolt Against Charcot's Too Absolute 

Conclusions--Fallacies Involved--Charcot's Attitude the Outcome of his 

Personal Temperament--Breuer and Freud--Their Views Supplement and 

Complete Charcot's--At the Same Time they Furnish a Justification for the 

Earlier Doctrine of Hysteria--But They Must Not be Regarded as Final--The 

Diffused Hysteroid Condition in Normal Persons--The Physiological Basis of 

Hysteria--True Pathological Hysteria is Linked on to almost Normal States, 

especially to Sex-hunger. 

 

 

The nocturnal hallucinations of hysteria, as all careful students of this 

condition now seem to agree, are closely allied to the hysterical attack 

proper. Sollier, indeed, one of the ablest of the more recent 

investigators of hysteria, has argued with much force that the subjects of 

hysteria really live in a state of pathological sleep, of 

vigilambulism.[251] He regards all the various accidents of hysteria as 

having a common basis in disturbances of sensibility, in the widest sense 

of the word "sensibility,"--as the very foundation of personality,--while 

anaesthesia is "the real _sigillum hysteriae_." Whatever the form of 

hysteria, we are thus only concerned with a more or less profound state of 

vigilambulism: a state in which the subject seems, often even to himself, 

to be more or less always asleep, whether the sleep may be regarded as 

local or general. Sollier agrees with Fere that the disorder of 

sensibility may be regarded as due to an exhaustion of the sensory centres 

of the brain, whether as the result of constitutional cerebral weakness, 

of the shock of a violent emotion, or of some toxic influence on the 

cerebral cells. 

 

We may, therefore, fitly turn from the auto-erotic phenomena of sleep 

which in women generally, and especially in hysterical women, seem to 

possess so much importance and significance, to the question--which has 

been so divergently answered at different periods and by different 

investigators--concerning the causation of hysteria, and especially 

concerning its alleged connection with conscious or unconscious sexual 

emotion.[252] 

 

It was the belief of the ancient Greeks that hysteria came from the womb; 

hence its name. We first find that statement in Plato's _Timaeus_: "In men 

the organ of generation--becoming rebellious and masterful, like an animal 

disobedient to reason, and maddened with the sting of lust--seeks to gain 

absolute sway; and the same is the case with the so-called womb, or 

uterus, of women; the animal within them is desirous of procreating 

children, and, when remaining unfruitful long beyond its proper time, gets 

discontented and angry, and, wandering in every direction through the 

body, closes up the passages of the breath, and, by obstructing 

respiration,[253] drives them to extremity, causing all varieties of 

disease." 

 

Plato, it is true, cannot be said to reveal anywhere a very scientific 

attitude toward Nature. Yet he was here probably only giving expression to 

the current medical doctrine of his day. We find precisely the same 

doctrine attributed to Hippocrates, though without a clear distinction 

between hysteria and epilepsy.[254] If we turn to the best Roman 

physicians we find again that Aretaeus, "the Esquirol of antiquity," has 

set forth the same view, adding to his description of the movements of the 


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