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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

womb in hysteria: "It delights, also, in fragrant smells, and advances 

toward them; and it has an aversion to foetid smells, and flies from them; 

and, on the whole, the womb is like an animal within an animal."[255] 

Consequently, the treatment was by applying foetid smells to the nose and 

rubbing fragrant ointments around the sexual parts.[256] 

 

The Arab physicians, who carried on the traditions of Greek medicine, 

appear to have said nothing new about hysteria, and possibly had little 

knowledge of it. In Christian mediaeval Europe, also, nothing new was added 

to the theory of hysteria; it was, indeed, less known medically than it 

had ever been, and, in part it may be as a result of this ignorance, in 

part as a result of general wretchedness (the hysterical phenomena of 

witchcraft reaching their height, Michelet points out, in the fourteenth 

century, which was a period of special misery for the poor), it flourished 

more vigorously. Not alone have we the records of nervous epidemics, but 

illuminated manuscripts, ivories, miniatures, bas-reliefs, frescoes, and 

engravings furnish the most vivid iconographic evidence of the prevalence 

of hysteria in its most violent forms during the Middle Ages. Much of this 

evidence is brought to the service of science in the fascinating works of 

Dr. P. Richer, one of Charcot's pupils.[257] 

 

In the seventeenth century Ambroise Pare was still talking, like 

Hippocrates, about "suffocation of the womb"; Forestus was still, like 

Aretaeus, applying friction to the vulva; Fernel was still reproaching 

Galen, who had denied that the movements of the womb produced hysteria. 

 

It was in the seventeenth century (1618) that a French physician, Charles 

Lepois (Carolus Piso), physician to Henry II, trusting, as he said, to 

experience and reason, overthrew at one stroke the doctrine of hysteria 

that had ruled almost unquestioned for two thousand years, and showed that 

the malady occurred at all ages and in both sexes, that its seat was not 

in the womb, but in the brain, and that it must be considered a nervous 

disease.[258] So revolutionary a doctrine could not fail to meet with 

violent opposition, but it was confirmed by Willis, and in 1681, we owe to 

the genius of Sydenham a picture of hysteria which for lucidity, 

precision, and comprehensiveness has only been excelled in our own times. 

 

It was not possible any longer to maintain the womb theory of Hippocrates 

in its crude form, but in modified forms, and especially with the object 

of preserving the connection which many observers continued to find 

between hysteria and the sexual emotions, it still found supporters in the 

eighteenth and even the nineteenth centuries. James, in the middle of the 

eighteenth century, returned to the classical view, and in his _Dictionary 

of Medicine_ maintained that the womb is the seat of hysteria. Louyer 

Villermay in 1816 asserted that the most frequent causes of hysteria are 

deprivation of the pleasures of love, griefs connected with this passion, 

and disorders of menstruation. Foville in 1833 and Landouzy in 1846 

advocated somewhat similar views. The acute Laycock in 1840 quoted as 

"almost a medical proverb" the saying, "_Salacitas major, major ad 

hysteriam proclivitas_," fully indorsing it. More recently still Clouston 

has defined hysteria as "the loss of the inhibitory influence exercised on 

the reproductive and sexual instincts of women by the higher mental and 


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