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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

moral functions" (a position evidently requiring some modification in view 

of the fact that hysteria is by no means confined to women), while the 

same authority remarks that more or less concealed sexual phenomena are 

the chief symptoms of "hysterical insanity."[259] Two gynaecologists of 

high position in different parts of the world, Hegar in Germany and 

Balls-Headley in Australia, attribute hysteria, as well as anaemia, largely 

to unsatisfied sexual desire, including the non-satisfaction of the "ideal 

feelings."[260] Lombroso and Ferrero, again, while admitting that the 

sexual feelings might be either heightened or depressed in hysteria, 

referred to the frequency of what they termed "a paradoxical sexual 

instinct" in the hysterical, by which, for instance, sexual frigidity is 

combined with intense sexual pre-occupations; and they also pointed out 

the significant fact that the crimes of the hysterical nearly always 

revolve around the sexual sphere.[261] Thus, even up to the time when the 

conception of hysteria which absolutely ignored and excluded any sexual 

relationship whatever had reached its height, independent views favoring 

such a relationship still found expression. 

 

Of recent years, however, such views usually aroused violent antagonism. 

The main current of opinion was with Briquet (1859), who, treating the 

matter with considerable ability and a wide induction of facts, 

indignantly repelled the idea that there is any connection between 

hysteria and the sexual facts of life, physical or psychic. As he himself 

admitted, Briquet was moved to deny a sexual causation of hysteria by the 

thought that such an origin would be degrading for women ("_a quelque 

chose de degradant pour les femmes_"). 

 

It was, however, the genius of Charcot, and the influence of his able 

pupils, which finally secured the overthrow of the sexual theory of 

hysteria. Charcot emphatically anathematized the visceral origin of 

hysteria; he declared that it is a psychic disorder, and to leave no 

loop-hole of escape for those who maintained a sexual causation he 

asserted that there are no varieties of hysteria, that the disease is one 

and indivisible. Charcot recognized no primordial cause of hysteria beyond 

heredity, which here plays a more important part than in any other 

neuropathic condition. Such heredity is either direct or more occasionally 

by transformation, any deviation of nutrition found in the ancestors 

(gout, diabetes, arthritis) being a possible cause of hysteria in the 

descendants. "We do not know anything about the nature of hysteria," 

Charcot wrote in 1892; "we must make it objective in order to recognize 

it. The dominant idea for us in the etiology of hysteria is, in the widest 

sense, its hereditary predisposition. The greater number of those 

suffering from this affection are simply born _hysterisables_, and on them 

the occasional causes act directly, either through autosuggestion or by 

causing derangement of general nutrition, and more particularly of the 

nutrition of the nervous system."[262] These views were ably and 

decisively stated in Gilles de la Tourette's _Traite de l'Hysterie_, 

written under the inspiration of Charcot. 

 

While Charcot's doctrine was thus being affirmed and generally accepted, 

there were at the same time workers in these fields who, though they by no 

means ignored this doctrine of hysteria or even rejected it, were inclined 

to think that it was too absolutely stated. Writing in the _Dictionary of 


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