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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

 

It may, however, be pointed out that Charcot's attitude toward hysteria 

was the outcome of his own temperament. He was primarily a neurologist, 

the bent of his genius was toward the investigation of facts that could be 

objectively demonstrated. His first interest in hysteria, dating from as 

far back as 1862, was in hystero-epileptic convulsive attacks, and to the 

last he remained indifferent to all facts which could not be objectively 

demonstrated. That was the secret of the advances he was enabled to make 

in neurology. For purely psychological investigation he had no liking, and 

probably no aptitude. Anyone who was privileged to observe his methods of 

work at the Salpetriere will easily recall the great master's towering 

figure; the disdainful expression, sometimes, even, it seemed, a little 

sour; the lofty bearing which enthusiastic admirers called Napoleonic. The 

questions addressed to the patient were cold, distant, sometimes 

impatient. Charcot clearly had little faith in the value of any results so 

attained. One may well believe, also, that a man whose superficial 

personality was so haughty and awe-inspiring to strangers would, in any 

case, have had the greatest difficulty in penetrating the mysteries of a 

psychic world so obscure and elusive as that presented by the 

hysterical.[271] 

 

The way was thus opened for further investigations on the psychic side. 

Charcot had affirmed the power, not only of physical traumatism, but even 

of psychic lesions--of moral shocks--to provoke its manifestations, but 

his sole contribution to the psychology of this psychic malady,--and this 

was borrowed from the Nancy school,--lay in the one word "suggestibility"; 

the nature and mechanism of this psychic process he left wholly 

unexplained. This step has been taken by others, in part by Janet, who, 

from 1889 onward, has not only insisted that the emotions stand in the 

first line among the causes of hysteria, but has also pointed out some 

portion of the mechanism of this process; thus, he saw the significance of 

the fact, already recognized, that strong emotions tend to produce 

anaesthesia and to lead to a condition of mental disaggregation, favorable 

to abulia, or abolition of will-power. It remained to show in detail the 

mechanism by which the most potent of all the emotions effects its 

influence, and, by attempting to do this, the Viennese investigators, 

Breuer and especially Freud, have greatly aided the study of 

hysteria.[272] They have not, it is important to remark, overturned the 

positive elements in their great forerunner's work. Freud began as a 

disciple of Charcot, and he himself remarks that, in his earlier 

investigations of hysteria, he had no thought of finding any sexual 

etiology for that malady; he would have regarded any such suggestion as an 

insult to his patient. The results reached by these workers were the 

outcome of long and detailed investigation. Freud has investigated many 

cases of hysteria in minute detail, often devoting to a single case over a 

hundred hours of work. The patients, unlike those on whom the results of 

the French school have been mainly founded, all belonged to the educated 

classes, and it was thus possible to carry out an elaborate psychic 

investigation which would be impossible among the uneducated. Breuer and 

Freud insist on the fine qualities of mind and character frequently found 

among the hysterical. They cannot accept suggestibility as an invariable 

characteristic of hysteria, only abnormal excitability; they are far from 


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