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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

rheumatic pain experienced by a daughter when nursing her father becomes 

the symbol in memory of her painful psychic excitement, and this perhaps 

for several reasons, but chiefly because _its presence in consciousness 

almost exactly coincided with that excitement_. In another way, again, 

nausea and vomiting may become a symbol through the profound sense of 

disgust with which some emotional shock was associated. Then the symbol 

begins to have a life of its own, and draws hidden strength from the 

emotion with which it is correlated. Breuer and Freud have found by 

careful investigation that the pains and physical troubles of hysteria are 

far from being capricious, but may be traced in a varying manner to an 

origin in some incident, some pain, some action, which was associated with 

a moment of acute psychic agony. The process of conversion was an 

involuntary escape from an intolerable emotion, comparable to the physical 

pain sometimes sought in intense mental grief, and the patient wins some 

relief from the tortured emotions, though at the cost of psychic 

abnormality, of a more or less divided state of consciousness and of 

physical pain, or else anaesthesia. In Charcot's third stage of the 

hysterical convulsion, that of "_attitudes passionnelles_," Breuer and 

Freud see the hallucinatory reproduction of a recollection which is full 

of significance for the origin of the hysterical manifestations. 

 

 

The final result reached by these workers is clearly stated by each 

writer. "The main observation of our predecessors," states Breuer,[277] 

"still preserved in the word 'hysteria,' is nearer to the truth than the 

more recent view which puts sexuality almost in the last line, with the 

object of protecting the patient from moral reproaches. Certainly the 

sexual needs of the hysterical are just as individual and as various in 

force as those of the healthy. But they suffer from them, and in large 

measure, indeed, they suffer precisely through the struggle with them, 

through the effort to thrust sexuality aside." "The weightiest fact," 

concludes Freud,[278] "on which we strike in a thorough pursuit of the 

analysis is this: From whatever side and from whatever symptoms we start, 

we always unfailingly reach the region of the sexual life. Here, first of 

all, an etiological condition of hysterical states is revealed.... At the 

bottom of every case of hysteria--and reproducible by an analytical effort 

after even an interval of long years--may be found one or more facts of 

precocious sexual experience belonging to earliest youth. I regard this as 

an important result, as the discovery of a _caput Nili_ of 

neuropathology." Ten years later, enlarging rather than restricting his 

conception, Freud remarks: "Sexuality is not a mere _deus ex machina_ 

which intervenes but once in the hysterical process; it is the motive 

force of every separate symptom and every expression of a symptom. The 

morbid phenomena constitute, to speak plainly, the patient's sexual 

activity."[279] The actual hysterical fit, Freud now states, may be 

regarded as "the substitute for a once practiced and then abandoned 

_auto-erotic_ satisfaction," and similarly it may be regarded as an 

equivalent of coitus.[280] 

 

It is natural to ask how this conception affects that elaborate picture of 

hysteria laboriously achieved by Charcot and his school. It cannot be said 

that it abolishes any of the positive results reached by Charcot, but it 


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