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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

It would be some confirmation of this position if we could 

believe that chlorosis, like hysteria, is in some degree a 

congenital condition. This was the view of Virchow, who regarded 

chlorosis as essentially dependent on a congenital hyoplasia of 

the arterial system. Stieda, on the basis of an elaborate study 

of twenty-three cases, has endeavored to prove that chlorosis is 

due to a congenital defect of development (_Zeitschrift fuer 

Geburtshuelfe und Gynaekologie_, vol. xxxii, Part I, 1895). His 

facts tend to prove that in chlorosis there are signs of general 

ill-development, and that, in particular, there is imperfect 

development of the breasts and sexual organs, with a tendency to 

contracted pelvis. Charrin, again, regards utero-ovarian 

inadequacy as at least one of the factors of chlorosis. 

Chlorosis, in its extreme form, may thus be regarded as a 

disorder of development, a sign of physical degeneracy. Even if 

not strictly a cause, a congenital condition may, as Stockman 

believes (_British Medical Journal_, December 14, 1895), be a 

predisposing influence. 

 

 

However it may be in extreme cases, there is very considerable 

evidence to indicate that the ordinary anaemia of young women may 

be due to a storing up of iron in the system, and is so far 

normal, being a preparation for the function of reproduction. 

Some observations of Bunge's seem to throw much light on the real 

cause of what may be termed physiological chlorosis. He found by 

a series of experiments on animals of different ages that young 

animals contain a much greater amount of iron in their tissues 

than adult animals; that, for instance, the body of a rabbit an 

hour after birth contains more than four times as much iron as 

that of a rabbit two and a half months old. It thus appears 

probable that at the period of puberty, and later, there is a 

storage of iron in the system preparatory to the exercise of the 

maternal functions. It is precisely between the ages of fifteen 

and twenty-three, as Stockman found by an analysis of his own 

cases (_British Medical Journal_, December 14, 1895), that the 

majority of cases occur; there was, indeed, he found, no case in 

which the first onset was later than the age of twenty-three. A 

similar result is revealed by the charts of Lloyd Jones, which 

cover a vastly greater number of cases. 

 

We owe to Lloyd Jones an important contribution to the knowledge 

of chlorosis in its physiological or normal relationships. He has 

shown that chlorosis is but the exaggeration of a condition that 

is normal at puberty (and, in many women, at each menstrual 

period), and which, there is good reason to believe, even has a 

favorable influence on fertility. He found that 

light-complexioned persons are more fertile than the 

dark-complexioned, and that at the same time the blood of the 

latter is of less specific gravity, containing less haemoglobin. 

Lloyd Jones also reached the generalization that girls who have 

had chlorosis are often remarkably pretty, so that the tendency 

to chlorosis is associated with all the sexual and reproductive 

aptitudes that make a woman attractive to a man. His conclusion 

is that the normal condition of which chlorosis is the extreme 

and pathological condition, is a preparation for motherhood (E. 


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