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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Lloyd Jones, "Chlorosis: The Special Anaemia of Young Women," 

1897; also numerous reports to the British Medical Association, 

published in the _British Medical Journal_. There was an 

interesting discussion of the theories of chlorosis at the Moscow 

International Medical Congress, in 1898; see proceedings of the 

congress, volume in, section v, pp. 224 et seq.). 

 

We may thus, perhaps, understand why it is that hysteria and 

anaemia are often combined, and why they are both most frequently 

found in adolescent young women who have yet had no sexual 

experiences. Chlorosis is a physical phenomenon; hysteria, 

largely a psychic phenomenon; yet, both alike may, to some extent 

at least, be regarded as sexual aptitude showing itself in 

extreme and pathological forms. 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[251] _Genese et Nature de l'Hysterie_, 1898; and, for Sollier's latest 

statement, see "Hysterie et Sommeil," _Archives de Neurologie_, May and 

June, 1907. Lombroso (_L'Uomo Delinquente_, 1889, vol. ii, p. 329), 

referring to the diminished metabolism of the hysterical, had already 

compared them to hibernating animals, while Babinsky states that the 

hysterical are in a state of subconsciousness, a state, as Metchnikoff 

remarks (_Essais optimistes_, p. 270), reminiscent of our prehistoric 

past. 

 

[252] Professor Freud, while welcoming the introduction of the term 

"auto-erotism," remarks that it should not be made to include the whole of 

hysteria. This I fully admit, and have never questioned. Hysteria is far 

too large and complex a phenomenon to be classed as entirely a 

manifestation of auto-erotism, but certain aspects of it are admirable 

illustrations of auto-erotic transformation. 

 

[253] The hysterical phenomenon of _globus hystericus_ was long afterward 

attributed to obstruction of respiration by the womb. The interesting case 

has been recorded by E. Bloch (_Wiener Klinische Wochenschrift_, 1907, p. 

1649) of a lady who had the feeling of a ball rising from her stomach to 

her throat, and then sinking. This feeling was associated with thoughts of 

her husband's rising and falling penis, and was always most liable to 

occur when she wished for coitus. 

 

[254] As Gilles de la Tourette points out, it is not difficult to show 

that epilepsy, the _morbus sacer_ of the ancients, owed much of its sacred 

character to this confusion with hysteria. Those priestesses who, struck 

by the _morbus sacer_, gave forth their oracles amid convulsions, were 

certainly not the victims of epilepsy, but of hysteria (_Traite de 

l'Hysterie_, vol. i, p. 3). 

 

[255] Aretaeus, _On the Causes and Symptoms of Acute Diseases_, Book ii, 

Chapter II. 

 

[256] It may be noted that this treatment furnishes another instance of 

the continuity of therapeutic methods, through all changes of theory, from 

the earliest to the latest times. Drugs of unpleasant odor, like 

asafoetida, have always been used in hysteria, and scientific medicine 

to-day still finds that asafoetida is a powerful sedative to the uterus, 

controlling nervous conditions during pregnancy and arresting uterine 

irritation when abortion is threatened (see, e.g., Warman, _Der 

Frauenarzt_, August, 1895). Again, the rubbing of fragrant ointments into 

the sexual regions is but a form of that massage which is one of the 

modern methods of treating the sexual disorders of women. 

 

[257] _Les Demoniaques dans l'Art_, 1887; _Les Malades et les Difformes 


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