Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

who have never experienced coitus, or, indeed, even in those who 

have. 

 

We must now turn to that aspect of our subject which in the past has 

always seemed the only aspect of auto-erotic phenomena meriting attention: 

the symptoms and results of chronic masturbation. It appears to have been 

an Englishman who, at the beginning of the eighteenth century, first 

called popular attention to the supposed evils of masturbation. His book 

was published in London, and entitled: _Onania, or the Heinous Sin of 

Self-pollution, and all its Frightful Consequences in both Sexes, 

Considered, with Spiritual and Physical Advice_, etc. It is not a serious 

medical treatise, but an early and certainly superior example of a kind of 

literature which we have since become familiar with through the daily 

newspapers. A large part of the book, which is cleverly written, is 

devoted in the later editions to the letters of nervous and 

hypochondriacal young men and women, who are too shy to visit the author, 

but request him to send a bottle of his "Strengthening Tincture," and 

mention that they are inclosing half a guinea, a guinea, or still larger 

sum. Concerning the composition of the "Strengthening Tincture" we are not 

informed.[316] This work, which was subsequently attributed to a writer 

named Bekkers, is said to have passed through no less than eighty 

editions, and it was translated into German. Tissot, a physician of 

Lausanne, followed with his _Traite de l'Onanisme: Dissertation sur les 

Maladies produites par la Masturbation_, first published in Latin (1760), 

then in French (1764), and afterward in nearly all European languages. He 

regarded masturbation as a crime, and as "an act of suicide." His book is 

a production of amusing exaggeration and rhetoric, zealously setting forth 

the prodigious evils of masturbation in a style which combines, as 

Christian remarks, the strains of Rousseau with a vein of religious piety. 

Tissot included only manual self-abuse under the term "onanism;" shortly 

afterward, Voltaire, in his _Dictionnaire Philosophique_, took up the 

subject, giving it a wider meaning and still further popularizing it. 

Finally Lallemand, at a somewhat later period (1836), wrote a book which 

was, indeed, more scientific in character, but which still sought to 

represent masturbation as the source of all evils. These four writers--the 

author of _Onania_, Tissot, Voltaire, Lallemand--are certainly responsible 

for much. The mistaken notions of many medical authorities, carried on by 

tradition, even down to our own time; the powerful lever which has been 

put into the hand of unscrupulous quacks; the suffering, dread, and 

remorse experienced in silence by many thousands of ignorant and often 

innocent young people may all be traced in large measure back to these 

four well-meaning, but (on this question) misguided, authors. 

 

 

 

 


Page 5 from 5:  Back   1   2   3   4  [5]