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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

repugnance; indeed, girls after their bath would freely pass, 

sometimes as if holding out their hair for innocent admiration, 

and this continued until countrymen of ours, by vile laughter and 

jests, made them guard themselves from insult by secrecy. So 

corruption spreads, and heathenism is blacker by our contact." 

(Private communication.) 

 

"Speaking once with a Japanese gentleman, I observed that we 

considered it an act of indecency for men and women to wash 

together. He shrugged his shoulders as he answered: 'But these 

Westerns have such prurient minds!'" (Mitford, _Tales of Old 

Japan_, 1871.) 

 

Dr. Carl Davidsohn, who remarks that he had ample opportunity of 

noting the great beauty of the Japanese women in a national 

dance, performed naked, points out that the Japanese have no 

aesthetic sense for the nude. "This was shown at the Jubilee 

Exposition at Kyoto. Here, among many rooms full of art objects, 

one was devoted to oil pictures in the European manner. Among 

these only one represented a nude figure, a Psyche, or Truth. It 

was the first time such a picture had been seen. Men and women 

crowded around it. After they had gazed at it for a time, most 

began to giggle and laugh; some by their air and gestures clearly 

showed their disgust; all found that it was not aesthetic to paint 

a naked woman, though in Nature, nakedness was in no way 

offensive to them. In the middle of the same city, at a fountain 

reputed to possess special virtues, men and women will stand 

together naked and let the water run over them." (Carl 

Davidsohn, "Das Nackte bei den Japanern," _Globus_, 1896, No. 

16.) 

 

"It is very difficult to investigate the hairiness of Ainu 

women," Baelz remarks, "for they possess a really incredible 

degree of modesty. Even when in summer they bathe--which happens 

but seldom--they keep their clothes on." He records that he was 

once asked to examine a girl at the Mission School, in order to 

advise as regards the treatment of a diseased spine; although she 

had been at the school for seven years, she declared that "she 

would rather die than show her back to a man, even though a 

doctor." (Baelz, "Die Aino," _Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1901, 

Heft 2, p. 178.) 

 

The Greeks, Etruscans, and Romans, appear to have been accustomed 

to cover the foreskin with the _kynodesme_ (a band), or the 

_fibula_ (a ring), for custom and modesty demanded that the glans 

should be concealed. Such covering is represented in persons who 

were compelled to be naked, and is referred to by Celsus as 

"decori causa." (L. Stieda, "Anatomisch-archaeologische Studien," 

_Anatomische Hefte_, Bd. XIX, Heft 2, 1902.) 

 

"Among the Lydians, and, indeed, among the barbarians generally, 

it is considered a deep disgrace, even for a man, to be seen 

naked." (Herodotus, Book I, Chapter X.) 

 

"The simple dress which is now common was first worn in Sparta, 

and there, more than anywhere else, the life of the rich was 

assimilated to that of the people. The Lacedaemonians, too, were 

the first who, in their athletic exercises, stripped naked and 

rubbed themselves over with oil. This was not the ancient custom; 

athletes formerly, even when they were contending at Olympia, 

wore girdles about their loins [earlier still, the Mycenaeans had 


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