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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

_Deipnosophists_, Yonge's translation, vol. iii, p. 829.) 

 

Dennis throws doubt on the foregoing statement of Athenaeus 

regarding the Tyrrhenians or Etruscans, and points out that the 

representations of women in Etruscan tombs shows them as clothed, 

even the breast being rarely uncovered. Nudity, he remarks, was a 

Greek, not an Etruscan, characteristic. "To the nudity of the 

Spartan women I need but refer; the Thessalian women are 

described by Persaeus dancing at banquets naked, or with a very 

scanty covering (_apud_ Athenaeus, xiii, c. 86). The maidens of 

Chios wrestled naked with the youths in the gymnasium, which 

Athenaeus (xiii, 20) pronounces to be 'a beautiful sight.' And at 

the marriage feast of Caranus, the Macedonian women tumblers 

performed naked before the guests (Athenaeus, iv, 3)." (G. Dennis, 

_Cities and Cemeteries of Etruria_, 1883, vol. i, p. 321.) 

 

In Rome, "when there was at first much less freedom in this 

matter than in Greece, the bath became common to both sexes, and 

though each had its basin and hot room apart, they could see each 

other, meet, speak, form intrigues, arrange meetings, and 

multiply adulteries. At first, the baths were so dark that men 

and women could wash side by side, without recognizing each other 

except by the voice; but soon the light of day was allowed to 

enter from every side. 'In the bath of Scipio,' said Seneca, 

'there were narrow ventholes, rather than windows, hardly 

admitting enough light to outrage modesty; but nowadays, baths 

are called caves if they do not receive the sun's rays through 

large windows.' ... Hadrian severely prohibited this mingling of 

men and women, and ordained separate lavaera for the sexes. 

Marcus Aurelius and Alexander Severus renewed this edict, but in 

the interval, Heliogabalus had authorized the sexes to meet in 

the baths." (Dufour, _Histoire de la Prostitution_, vol. ii, Ch. 

XVIII; cf. Smith's _Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities_, 

Art. Balneae.) 

 

In Rome, according to ancient custom, actors were compelled to 

wear drawers (_subligaculum_) on the stage, in order to safeguard 

the modesty of Roman matrons. Respectable women, it seems, also 

always wore some sort of _subligaculum_, even sometimes when 

bathing. The name was also applied to a leathern girdle laced 

behind, which they were occasionally made to wear as a girdle of 

chastity. (Dufour, op. cit., vol. ii, p. 150.) Greek women also 

wore a cloth round the loins when taking the bath, as did the men 

who bathed there; and a woman is represented bathing and wearing 

a sort of thin combinations reaching to the middle of the thigh. 

(Smith's _Dictionary_, loc. cit.) At a later period, St. 

Augustine refers to the _compestria_, the drawers or apron worn 

by young men who stripped for exercise in the _campus_. (_De 

Civitate Dei_, Bk. XIV, Ch. XVII.) 

 

Lecky (_History of Morals_, vol. ii, p. 318), brings together 

instances of women, in both Pagan and early Christian times, who 

showed their modesty by drawing their garments around them, even 

at the moment that they were being brutally killed. Plutarch, in 

his essay on the "Virtues of Women,"--moralizing on the 

well-known story of the young women of Milesia, among whom an 

epidemic of suicide was only brought to an end by the decree that 


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