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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

similar to those so vividly described by Soeur Jeanne des Anges, though it 

is very rarely that any saint has so frankly presented the dynamic 

mechanism of the auto-erotic process. The indications they give us, 

however, are sufficiently clear. It is enough to refer to the special 

affection which the mystics have ever borne toward the Song of 

Songs,[405] and to note how the most earthly expressions of love in that 

poem enter as a perpetual refrain into their writings.[406] 

 

The courage of the early Christian martyrs, it is abundantly evident, was 

in part supported by an exaltation which they frankly drew from the sexual 

impulse. Felicula, we are told in the acts of Achilles and Nereus,[407] 

preferred imprisonment, torture, and death to marriage or pagan 

sacrifices. When on the rack she was bidden to deny Christianity, she 

exclaimed: "_Ego non nego amatorem meum!_"--I will not deny my lover who 

for my sake has eaten gall and drunk vinegar, crowned with thorns, and 

fastened to the cross. 

 

Christian mysticism and its sexual coloring was absorbed by the Islamic 

world at a very early period and intensified. In the thirteenth century it 

was reintroduced into Christendom in this intensified form by the genius 

of Raymond Lull who had himself been born on the confines of Islam, and 

his "Book of the Lover and the Friend" is a typical manifestation of 

sexual mysticism which inspired the great Spanish school of mystics a few 

centuries later. The "delicious agony" the "sweet martyrdom," the strongly 

combined pleasure and pain experienced by St. Theresa were certainly 

associated with physical sexual sensations.[408] 

 

The case of Marguerite-Marie Alacoque is typical. Jesus, as her 

autobiography shows, was always her lover, her husband, her dear master; 

she is betrothed to Him, He is the most passionate of lovers, nothing can 

be sweeter than His caresses, they are so excessive she is beside herself 

with the delight of them. The central imagination of the mystic consists 

essentially, as Ribot remarks, in a love romance.[409] 

 

If we turn to the most popular devotional work that was ever written, _The 

Imitation of Christ_, we shall find that the "love" there expressed is 

precisely and exactly the love that finds its motive power in the emotions 

aroused by a person of the other sex. (A very intellectual woman once 

remarked to me that the book seemed to her "a sort of religious 

aphrodisiac.") If we read, for instance, Book III, Chapter V, of this work 

("De Mirabili affectu Divini amoris"), we shall find in the eloquence of 

this solitary monk in the Low Countries neither more nor less than the 

emotions of every human lover at their highest limit of exaltation. 

"Nothing is sweeter than love, nothing stronger, nothing higher, nothing 

broader, nothing pleasanter, nothing fuller nor better in heaven or in 

earth. He who loves, flies, runs, and rejoices; he is free and cannot be 

held. He gives all in exchange for all, and possesses all in all. He looks 

not at gifts, but turns to the giver above all good things. Love knows no 

measure, but is fervent beyond all measure. Love feels no burden, thinks 

nothing of labor, strives beyond its force, reckons not of impossibility, 

for it judges that all things are possible. Therefore it attempts all 

things, and therefore it effects much when he who is not a lover fails and 

falls.... My Love! thou all mine, and I all thine." 


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