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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

show to a man any portion of her body naked, for fear lest both 

fall: the one by gazing eagerly, the other by delighting to 

attract those eager glances." (_Paedagogus_, Book II, Chapter V.) 

 

James, Bishop of Nisibis, in the fourth century, was a man of 

great holiness. We are told by Thedoret that once, when James had 

newly come into Persia, it was vouchsafed to him to perform a 

miracle under the following circumstances: He chanced to pass by 

a fountain where young women were washing their linen, and, his 

modesty being profoundly shocked by the exposure involved in this 

occupation, he cursed the fountain, which instantly dried up, and 

he changed the hair of the girls from black to a sandy color. 

(Jortin, _Remarks on Ecclesiastical History_, vol. iii, p. 4.) 

 

Procopius, writing in the sixth century after Christ, and 

narrating how the Empress Theodora, in early life, would often 

appear almost naked before the public in the theatre, adds that 

she would willingly have appeared altogether nude, but that "no 

woman is allowed to expose herself altogether, unless she wears 

at least short drawers over the lower part of the abdomen." 

Chrysostom mentions, at the end of the fourth century, that 

Arcadius attempted to put down the August festival (Majuma), 

during which women appeared naked in the theatres, or swimming in 

large baths. 

 

In mediaeval days, "ladies, at all events, as represented by the 

poets, were not, on the whole, very prudish. Meleranz surprised a 

lady who was taking a bath under a lime tree; the bath was 

covered with samite, and by it was a magnificent ivory bed, 

surrounded by tapestries representing the history of Paris and 

Helen, the destruction of Troy, the adventures of AEneas, etc. As 

Meleranz rides by, the lady's waiting-maids run away; she 

herself, however, with quick decision, raises the samite which 

covers the tub, and orders him to wait on her in place of the 

maids. He brings her shift and mantle, and shoes, and then stands 

aside till she is dressed; when she has placed herself on the 

bed, she calls him back and commands him to drive away the flies 

while she sleeps. Strange to say, the men are represented as more 

modest than the women. When two maidens prepared a bath for 

Parzival, and proposed to bathe him, according to custom, the 

inexperienced young knight was shy, and would not enter the bath 

until they had gone; on another occasion, he jumped quickly into 

bed when the maidens entered the room. When Wolfdieterich was 

about to undress, he had to ask the ladies who pressed around him 

to leave him alone for a short time, as he was ashamed they 

should see him naked. When Amphons of Spain, bewitched by his 

step-mother into a were-wolf, was at last restored, and stood 

suddenly naked before her, he was greatly ashamed. The maiden who 

healed Iwein was tender of his modesty. In his love-madness, the 

hero wanders for a time naked through the wood; three women find 

him asleep, and send a waiting-maid to annoint him with salve; 

when he came to himself, the maiden hid herself. On the whole, 

however, the ladies were not so delicate; they had no hesitation 

in bathing with gentlemen, and on these occasions would put their 

finest ornaments on their heads. I know no pictures of the 


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