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GENERAL PREFACE
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-1.6
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.1
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.2
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.4
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-2.5
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-3
THE EVOLUTION OF MODESTY-4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-1.2
FOOTNOTES
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-2.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.1
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.2
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.3
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.4
THE PHENOMENA OF SEXUAL PERIODICITY-3.5
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1.6
FOOTNOTES
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.1
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.2
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.3
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.4
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.5
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.6
AUTO-EROTISM: A STUDY OF THE SPONTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3.7
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A-1.1
APPENDIX A-1.2
APPENDIX B-1.1
APPENDIX B-1.2
APPENDIX C-1.1
APPENDIX C-1.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

hand, by chance, under your neck-handkerchief; for a modest woman 

never did so." (Mary Wollstonecraft, _The Rights of Woman_, 1792, 

pp. 277, 289.) 

 

At the present time a knowledge of the physiology of plants is 

not usually considered inconsistent with modesty, but a knowledge 

of animal physiology is still so considered by many. Dr. H.R. 

Hopkins, of New York, wrote in 1895, regarding the teaching of 

physiology: "How can we teach growing girls the functions of the 

various parts of the human body, and still leave them their 

modesty? That is the practical question that has puzzled me for 

years." 

 

In England, the use of drawers was almost unknown among women 

half a century ago, and was considered immodest and unfeminine. 

Tilt, a distinguished gynecologist of that period, advocated such 

garments, made of fine calico, and not to descend below the knee, 

on hygienic grounds. "Thus understood," he added, "the adoption 

of drawers will doubtless become more general in this country, 

as, being worn without the knowledge of the general observer, 

they will be robbed of the prejudice usually attached to an 

appendage deemed masculine." (Tilt, _Elements of Health_, 1852, 

p. 193.) Drawers came into general use among women during the 

third quarter of the nineteenth century. 

 

Drawers are an Oriental garment, and seem to have reached Europe 

through Venice, the great channel of communication with the East. 

Like many other refinements of decency and cleanliness, they were 

at first chiefly cultivated by prostitutes, and, on this account, 

there was long a prejudice against them. Even at the present day, 

it is said that in France, a young peasant girl will exclaim, if 

asked whether she wears drawers: "I wear drawers, Madame? A 

respectable girl!" Drawers, however, quickly became acclimatized 

in France, and Dufour (op. cit., vol. vi, p. 28) even regards 

them as essentially a French garment. They were introduced at the 

Court towards the end of the fourteenth century, and in the 

sixteenth century were rendered almost necessary by the new 

fashion of the _vertugale_, or farthingale. In 1615, a lady's 

_calecons_ are referred to as apparently an ordinary garment. It 

is noteworthy that in London, in the middle of the same century, 

young Mrs. Pepys, who was the daughter of French parents, usually 

wore drawers, which were seemingly of the closed kind. (_Diary_ 

of S. Pepys, ed. Wheatley, May 15, 1663, vol. iii.) They were 

probably not worn by Englishwomen, and even in France, with the 

decay of the farthingale, they seem to have dropped out of use 

during the seventeenth century. In a technical and very complete 

book, _L'Art de la Lingerie_, published in 1771, women's drawers 

are not even mentioned, and Mercier (_Tableau de Paris_, 1783, 

vol. vii, p. 54) says that, except actresses, Parisian women do 

not wear drawers. Even by ballet dancers and actresses on the 

stage, they were not invariably worn. Camargo, the famous dancer, 

who first shortened the skirt in dancing, early in the eighteenth 

century, always observed great decorum, never showing the leg 

above the knee; when appealed to as to whether she wore drawers, 

she replied that she could not possibly appear without such a 


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